C# Wrapper for Power BI REST API – Version 2

Some time ago, when Microsoft released the first version of Power BI Rest API I already wrote a wrapper for C# which allowed you to map the object from the API into regular C# objects and work with them locally. However, there have been some major upgrades since then (Actually they were already announced in July 2016 but I did not find anytime to work on this again until now Smile ). Anyway, I just published a new version of my C# wrapper on my GitHub site: https://github.com/gbrueckl/PowerBI.API.Client

To use it, you first need to create an Azure AD application and get an ApplicationID – this is very well described here or can be done directly at https://dev.powerbi.com/apps

A new PowerBI API Client object can then be created using the ApplicationID:

Create a PowerBI API Client
PBIAPIClient pbic = new PBIAPIClient(ApplicationID);

Basically, most of the features described in the API reference are also included in the API Wrapper. So you can now use C# to create your PowerBI model locally and deploy it to the PowerBI service! The only to keep in mind is that the dataset you create via the API can only be sourced by pushing data into it using the Push/Streaming API. As this can be quite cumbersome sometimes, I also added the functionality to publish a whole C# DataTable with basically just two lines of code to publish your reference data/dimensions:

Publish DataTable to PowerBI
// create a regular DataTable – but could also be derived from a SQL Database!
DataTable dataTable = new DataTable();
/* populate the dataTable */
// create a PBI table from a regular DataTable object
PBITable productsTable = new PBITable(dataTable);
// publish the table and push the rows from the dataTable to the PowerBI table
productsTable.PublishToPowerBI(true);

 

This snippet basically deploys the table structure to the PowerBI service and populates it with data from the DataTable:
Published_DataTable

 

For your “fact”-data you can also create single rows on your own using the PBIRow-object and publish them manually e.g. for WriteBack-scenarios:

Publish Rows to PowerBI
salesTable.DeleteRowsFromPowerBI();
PBIRow row = salesTable.GetSampleRow();
row.SetValue("ProductKey", 1);
row.SetValue("SalesDate", DateTime.Now);
row.SetValue("Amount_BASE", 100);
salesTable.PushRowToPowerBI(row);

Depending on the type of DataSet you choose (Push, PushStreaming or Streaming), you can also create DAX Measures or Relationships:

Add Measures and Relationships
salesTable.Measures.Add(new PBIMeasure("Sales Amount", "SUM('{0}'[{1}])", tableNameFacts, "Amount_BASE")); // adding a measure
dataset.Relationships.Add(new PBIRelationship("MyRelationship", salesTable.GetColumnByName("ProductKey"), productsTable.GetColumnByName("ProductKey")));

 

Of course, all the features that were already supported in the first version, are still supported:

  • Get Embed-URLs of Reports and Tiles
  • List Reports, Dashboards, Datasets, …

The new version also supports Streaming and PushStreaming datasets in the same way as it does for regular Push datasets. For details on Streaming datasets please take a look at Real-time streaming in PowerBI

I recommend to explore the API on your own by simply building your first PowerBI Push/Streaming Model on your own!
For the latest features and improvements please refer to the GitHub repository which will be updated frequently.

Any feedback and participation in the further development is highly appreciated and will be done via the GitHub repository.

C# Wrapper for Power BI REST API

Since the last major update last year, Power BI offers some APIs which can be used to interact with content and also data that is stored in Power BI. Microsoft provides a good set of samples on how to use the APIs on GitHub and also a an interactive APIARY web-UI which you can use to build and test API calls on-the-fly. However, it can still be quite cumbersome as you have to deal with all the REST API calls and the returned JSON on your own. So I decided to write a little C# Wrapper where you simply pass in your Azure AD Application Client ID and you can deal with all Object of the Power BI API as they were regular C# objects.

Here is a little example on how to list all available reports and get the EmbedURL of a given tile using the PowerBIClient:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using pmOne.PowerBI;
using pmOne.PowerBI.PowerBIObjects;

namespace SampleApplication
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            PowerBIClient pbic = new PowerBIClient(“ef4aed1a-9cab-4bb3-94ea-ffffffffffff”);

            Console.WriteLine(“Available Reports:”);
            foreach(PBIReport pbir in pbic.Reports)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(pbir.Name);
            }

            Console.WriteLine();
            Console.WriteLine(“Get EmbedURL for Tile [Retail Analysis Sample].[This Year’s Sales]”);
            Console.WriteLine(pbic.GetDashboardByName(“Retail Analysis Sample”).GetTileByName(“This Year’s Sales”).EmbedURL);

            Console.WriteLine(“Press <Enter> to exit …”);
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}

As you can see, its pretty simple and very easy to use, even for non-developers. You can find all the source-code and the sample application for download below. The code as I have written it is very likely not the best code possible, but it works for my needs, is straight forward, simple and saves me a lot of work and time when dealing with the PowerBI API. Also, if the API changes, you may need to adopt the code accordingly. However, for the future I hope that Microsoft provides some metadata so that VisualStudio can build all this code automatically using e.g. Swagger. But for the time being feel free to use, improve or extend my code Smile

SourceCode: PowerBIClient_Source.zip