Configure HTTP access to Analysis Services using PowerShell

Recently I had to setup an Analysis Services cube and expose it to external users. This is usually done by using Internet Information Server (IIS) and creating a new WebSite which hosts msmdpump.dll. This DLL more or less wraps XMLA commands inside HTTP thus allowing external users to access the cube via HTTP. Besides Windows Authentication this setup also allows Basic Authentication and so external users can simply connect by specifying Username and Password in e.g. Excel when connecting to the cube:
ExcelConnectionDialog

There are already a lot of whitepapers out there which describe how to set things up correctly. Here are just some examples:
– MSDN: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg492140.aspx
– MSBI Academy (great video!): http://msbiacademy.com/?p=5711 by Rob Kerr

They provide very useful information and you should be familiar with the general setup before proceeding here or using the final PowerShell script.

The PowerShell script basically performs the following steps:

  1. Create a local folder as base for your WebSite in IIS
  2. Copy SSAS ISAPI files (incl. msmdpump.dll) to the folder
  3. Create and Configure an IIS AppPool
  4. Create and Configure a IIS WebSite
  5. Add and enable an ISAPI entry for msmdpump.dll
  6. Configure Authentication
  7. Configure Default Document
  8. Update connection information to SSAS server

I tested it successfully with a clean installation of IIS 8.0 (using applicationhost.config.clean.install). In case you already have other WebSites running you may still consider doing the steps manually or adopting the script if necessary. The script is written not to overwrite any existing Folders, WebSites, etc. but you never know.

So here is my final script:

  1. #Import Modules
  2. Import-Module WebAdministration
  3.  
  4. # change these settings
  5. $iisSiteName = "OLAP"
  6. $iisPort = "8000"
  7. $olapServerName = "server\instance"
  8.  
  9. # optionally also change these settings
  10. $isapiFiles = "c:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\MSAS11.MSSQLSERVER\OLAP\bin\isapi\*"
  11. $iisAbsolutePath = "C:\inetpub\wwwroot\" + $iisSiteName
  12. $iisAppPoolName = $iisSiteName + "_AppPool"
  13. $iisAppPoolUser = "" #default is ApplicationPoolIdentity
  14. $iisAppPoolPassword = ""
  15. $iisAuthAnonymousEnabled = $false
  16. $iisAuthWindowsEnabled = $true
  17. $iisAuthBasicEnabled = $true
  18. $olapSessionTimeout = "3600" #default
  19. $olapConnectionPoolSize = "100" #default
  20.  
  21. if(!(Test-Path $iisAbsolutePath -pathType container))
  22. {
  23.     #Creating Directory
  24.     mkdir $iisAbsolutePath  | Out-Null
  25.  
  26.     #Copying Files
  27.     Write-Host -NoNewline "Copying ISAPI files to IIS Folder … "
  28.     Copy -Path $isapiFiles -Destination $iisAbsolutePath -Recurse
  29.     Write-Host " Done!" -ForegroundColor Green
  30. }
  31. else
  32. {
  33.     Write-Host "Path $iisAbsolutePath already exists! Please delete manually if you want to proceed!" -ForegroundColor Red
  34.     Exit
  35. }
  36.  
  37. #Check if AppPool already exists
  38. if(!(Test-Path $("IIS:\\AppPools\" + $iisAppPoolName) -pathType container))
  39. {
  40.     #Creating AppPool
  41.     Write-Host -NoNewline "Creating ApplicationPool $iisAppPoolName if it does not exist yet … "
  42.     $appPool = New-WebAppPool -Name $iisAppPoolName
  43.     $appPool.managedRuntimeVersion = "v2.0"
  44.     $appPool.managedPipelineMode = "Classic"
  45.  
  46.     $appPool.processModel.identityType = 4 #0=LocalSystem, 1=LocalService, 2=NetworkService, 3=SpecificUser, 4=ApplicationPoolIdentity
  47.     #For details see http://www.iis.net/configreference/system.applicationhost/applicationpools/add/processmodel
  48.  
  49.     if ($iisAppPoolUser -ne "" -AND $iisAppPoolPassword -ne "") {
  50.         Write-Host
  51.         Write-Host "Setting AppPool Identity to $iisAppPoolUser"
  52.         $appPool.processmodel.identityType = 3
  53.         $appPool.processmodel.username = $iisAppPoolUser
  54.         $appPool.processmodel.password = $iisAppPoolPassword
  55.     }
  56.     $appPool | Set-Item
  57.     Write-Host " Done!" -ForegroundColor Green
  58. }
  59. else
  60. {
  61.     Write-Host "AppPool $iisAppPoolName already exists! Please delete manually if you want to proceed!" -ForegroundColor Red
  62.     Exit
  63. }
  64.  
  65. #Check if WebSite already exists
  66. $iisSite = Get-Website $iisSiteName
  67. if ($iisSite -eq $null)
  68. {
  69.     #Creating WebSite
  70.     Write-Host -NoNewline "Creating WebSite $iisSiteName if it does not exist yet … "
  71.     $iisSite = New-WebSite -Name $iisSiteName -PhysicalPath $iisAbsolutePath -ApplicationPool $iisAppPoolName -Port $iisPort
  72.     Write-Host " Done!" -ForegroundColor Green
  73. }
  74. else
  75. {
  76.     Write-Host "WebSite $iisSiteName already exists! Please delete manually if you want to proceed!" -ForegroundColor Red
  77.     Exit
  78. }
  79.  
  80. #Ensuring ISAPI CGI Restriction entry exists for msmdpump.dll
  81. if ((Get-WebConfiguration "/system.webServer/security/isapiCgiRestriction/add[@path='$iisAbsolutePath\msmdpump.dll']") -eq $null)
  82. {
  83.     Write-Host -NoNewline "Adding ISAPI CGI Restriction for $iisAbsolutePath\msmdpump.dll … "
  84.     Add-WebConfiguration "/system.webServer/security/isapiCgiRestriction" -PSPath:IIS:\\  -Value @{path="$iisAbsolutePath\msmdpump.dll"}
  85.     Write-Host " Done!" -ForegroundColor Green
  86. }
  87. #Enabling ISAPI CGI Restriction for msmdpump.dll
  88. Write-Host -NoNewline "Updating existing ISAPI CGI Restriction … "
  89. Set-WebConfiguration "/system.webServer/security/isapiCgiRestriction/add[@path='$iisAbsolutePath\msmdpump.dll']/@allowed" -PSPath:IIS:\\ -Value "True"
  90. Set-WebConfiguration "/system.webServer/security/isapiCgiRestriction/add[@path='$iisAbsolutePath\msmdpump.dll']/@description" -PSPath:IIS:\\ -Value "msmdpump.dll for SSAS"
  91. Write-Host " Done!" -ForegroundColor Green
  92.  
  93.  
  94. #Adding ISAPI Handler to WebSite
  95. Write-Host -NoNewline "Adding ISAPI Handler … "
  96. Add-WebConfiguration /system.webServer/handlers -PSPath $iisSite.PSPath -Value @{name="msmdpump"; path="*.dll"; verb="*"; modules="IsapiModule"; scriptProcessor="$iisAbsolutePath\msmdpump.dll"; resourceType="File"; preCondition="bitness64"}
  97. Write-Host " Done!" -ForegroundColor Green
  98.  
  99. #enable Windows and Basic Authentication
  100. Write-Host -NoNewline "Setting Authentication Providers … "
  101. #need to Unlock sections first
  102. Set-WebConfiguration /system.webServer/security/authentication/anonymousAuthentication  MACHINE/WEBROOT/APPHOST -Metadata overrideMode -Value Allow
  103. Set-WebConfiguration /system.webServer/security/authentication/windowsAuthentication  MACHINE/WEBROOT/APPHOST -Metadata overrideMode -Value Allow
  104. Set-WebConfiguration /system.webServer/security/authentication/basicAuthentication  MACHINE/WEBROOT/APPHOST -Metadata overrideMode -Value Allow
  105.  
  106. Set-WebConfiguration /system.webServer/security/authentication/anonymousAuthentication -PSPath $iisSite.PSPath -Value @{enabled=$iisAuthAnonymousEnabled}
  107. Set-WebConfiguration /system.webServer/security/authentication/windowsAuthentication -PSPath $iisSite.PSPath -Value @{enabled=$iisAuthWindowsEnabled}
  108. Set-WebConfiguration /system.webServer/security/authentication/basicAuthentication -PSPath $iisSite.PSPath -Value @{enabled=$iisAuthBasicEnabled}
  109. Write-Host " Done!" -ForegroundColor Green
  110.  
  111. #Adding Default Document
  112. Write-Host -NoNewline "Adding Default Document msmdpump.dll … "
  113. Add-WebConfiguration /system.webServer/defaultDocument/files -PSPath $iisSite.PSPath -atIndex 0 -Value @{value="msmdpump.dll"}
  114. Write-Host " Done!" -ForegroundColor Green
  115.  
  116. #Updating OLAP Server Settings
  117. Write-Host -NoNewline "Updating OLAP Server Settings … "
  118. [xml]$msmdpump = Get-Content "$iisAbsolutePath\msmdpump.ini"
  119. $msmdpump.ConfigurationSettings.ServerName = $olapServerName
  120. $msmdpump.ConfigurationSettings.SessionTimeout = $olapSessionTimeout
  121. $msmdpump.ConfigurationSettings.ConnectionPoolSize = $olapConnectionPoolSize
  122. $msmdpump.Save("$iisAbsolutePath\msmdpump.ini")
  123. Write-Host " Done!" -ForegroundColor Green
  124.  
  125. Write-Host "Everything done! "
  126. Write-Host "The SSAS server can now be accessed via http://$env:computername`:$iisPort"

 

The script can also be downloaded here.

The process of setting up HTTP connectivity is the same for Analysis Services Multidimensional and Tabular so the script works for both scenarios, just change the server name accordingly.

Restoring a SSAS Tabular Model to Power Pivot

It is a very common scenario to create a SSAS Tabular Model out of an Power Pivot Model contained in an Excel workbook. Microsoft even created an wizard (or actually a separate Visual Studio project) that supports you doing this. Even further, this process is also a major part of Microsoft’s strategy to cover Personal BI, Team BI and Corporate BI within one technology being xVelocity. This all works just fine but there may also be scenarios where you need to do it the other way round – converting a Tabular model to Power Pivot. Several use-cases come into my mind but I am sure that the most important one is to making data available offline for e.g. sales people to take it with them on their every day work. And in this blog post I will show how this can be done!

But before taking a closer look into how this can be accomplished, lets first see how the import from Power Pivot to SSAS Tabular works. To do this start SQL Server Profiler and connect to your tabular instance. Then create a new Tabular project in Visual Studio based on an existing Power Pivot workbook. At this point you will notice a lot of events happening on our SSAS Tabular server. The most important event for us is “Command End” with the EventSubclass “9 – restore”:
RestoreFromPowerPivot

SSAS actually restores a backup from a “Model.abf” backup file which is located in our project directory that we just created:
BackupExtractedFromPowerPivot

So far so good – but where does this file come from?

Well, the origin of the file has to be our Excel workbook that we imported. Knowing that all new office formats ending with “x” (.xlsx, .docx, …) are basically ZIP files, we can inspect our original Excel workbook by simply rename it to “.zip”. This allows us to browse the Excel file structure:
ExcelUnzipped

We will find a folder called “xl” which contains a sub-folder called “model”. This folder contains one item called “item.data”. If you take a closer look at the file size you may realize that both, the “Model.abf” file that we restored and the “item.data” file from our Excel workbook have the exact same size:
FileProperties

A Coincidence? Not really!

What happens behind the scenes when you import a Power Pivot model into SSAS Tabular is that this “item.data” file gets copied into your project directory and is renamed to “Model.abf” and then restored to the SSAS Tabular workspace instance by using an standard database restore.

Having this information probably makes you think: If it works in one direction, why wouldn’t it also work the other way round? And it does!

So here are the steps that you need to do in order to restore your SSAS Tabular backup into an Excel Power Pivot workbook:

  1. Create a backup of your SSAS Tabular database and rename it to “item.data”
  2. Create an empty Excel workbook and add a simple linked table to the Excel data model (which is actually Power Pivot).
    This is necessary to tell Excel that the workbook contains a Power Pivot model which has to be loaded once the file is opened.
  3. Close the Excel workbook and rename it from “MyFile.xlsx” to “MyFile.xlsx.zip”
  4. Open the .zip-file in Windows Explorer and locate the “\xl\model\”-folder
  5. Replace the “item.data” file with the file that you created in step 1.
  6. Rename the .zip-file back to “MyFile.xlsx”
  7. Open the Excel Workbook
  8. Voilá! You can now work with the data model as with any other Power Pivot model!

I tested this with a SSAS Tabular backup from SQL Server 2012 SP1 being restored to the streamed version of Excel from Office 365 with the latest version of Power Pivot. I assume that it also works with older versions but have not tested all combinations yet.

There are also some features that will not work, for example roles. If your Tabular database contains roles you will not be able to use this approach. Excel will complain that the Power Pivot model is broken. However, other Tabular features like partitions actually work with the little limitation that you cannot change them later on in the Power Pivot model or process them separately:
PowerPivotPartitions
Another thing to note here is that only up to 3 partitions are allowed, otherwise you will get the same error as for roles. I think this is related to the limitation of 3 partitions for SQL Server Analysis Services Standard Edition as Chris Webb described here.

Besides these obvious features there are also some other cool things that you can do in Tabular which are not possible in Power Pivot. Most (or actually all) of them are accessible only by using BIDS Helper – a great THANK YOU to the developers of BIDS Helper at this point!
BIDS Helper enables you to add classical multidimensional features also to Tabular models which is not possible using standard Visual Studio only. Those include:

  • DisplayFolders
  • Translations (metadata only)
  • Actions

I tested it for DisplayFolders and Actions and both are working also in Power Pivot after the backup was restored and I further assume that all the other things will also work just fine.
Simply keep in mind that Power Pivot is basically a fully featured Analysis Services instance running within Excel!

For my (and your) convenience I also created a little PowerShell script that does all the work:

  1. # Load the assembly with the ZipFile class
  2. [System.Reflection.Assembly]::LoadWithPartialName("System.IO.Compression.FileSystem") | Out-Null
  3. # Load the assembly to access Analysis Services
  4. [System.Reflection.Assembly]::LoadWithPartialName("Microsoft.AnalysisServices") | Out-Null
  5. # Also install "Analysis Services PowerShell" according to http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh213141.aspx
  6.  
  7. # INPUT-Variables, change these to match your environment
  8. $rootFolder = "D:\Test_PowerShell\"
  9. $emptyExcelFile = $rootFolder + "EmptyExcel.xlsx"
  10. $ssasServerName = "localhost\TAB2012"
  11. $ssasDatabaseName = "AdventureWorks"
  12.  
  13. # internal variables
  14. $newExcelFile = $rootFolder + $ssasDatabaseName + ".xlsx"
  15. $newExcelFileZip = $newExcelFile + ".zip"
  16. $unzipFolder = $rootFolder + "TEMP_ExcelUnzipped"
  17. $backupFile = $rootFolder + $ssasDatabaseName + ".abf"
  18. $itemDestination = $unzipFolder + "\xl\model\item.data"
  19.  
  20. # Copy the empty Excel file and rename it to ".zip"
  21. Copy-Item -Path $emptyExcelFile -Destination $newExcelFileZip
  22.  
  23. # Unzip the file using the ZipFile class
  24. [System.IO.Compression.ZipFile]::ExtractToDirectory($newExcelFileZip, $unzipFolder)
  25.  
  26. # Create a backup of the SSAS Tabular database
  27. Backup-ASDatabase -Server $ssasServerName -Name $ssasDatabaseName -BackupFile $backupFile -AllowOverwrite -ApplyCompression
  28.  
  29. # Copy the backup-file to our extracted Excel folder structure
  30. Copy-Item -Path $backupFile -Destination $itemDestination -Force
  31.  
  32. # Check if the target file exists and delete it
  33. if (Test-Path -Path $newExcelFile) { Remove-Item -Path $newExcelFile }
  34.  
  35. # Zip the folder-structure again using the ZipFile class and rename it to ".xlsx"
  36. [System.IO.Compression.ZipFile]::CreateFromDirectory($unzipFolder, $newExcelFile)
  37.  
  38. # Cleanup the unecessary files
  39. Remove-Item -Path $unzipFolder -Recurse
  40. Remove-Item -Path $backupFile
  41. Remove-Item -Path $newExcelFileZip

The last thing to mention here is that I don’t know if this is officially supported in any way by Microsoft – actually I am pretty sure it is not – so watch out what you are doing and don’t complain if something is not working as expected.